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THE FOUNDATIONS OF BURG SCHAUBECK

​Situated on a twisting, undercut bank on the River Bottwar, Burg Schaubeck dates back to at least 1272. Shielded from storms on the side facing the river, with the other side facing the mountain and set apart by a frontal ditch and a circular trench, the Burg (“Castle”) was originally very well-fortified, though few traces remain of this function today. During the High Middle Ages, Burg Schaubeck dominated the ancient highway known today as Alte Kleinbottwarer Straße, which runs along the wall of the garden and on towards Steinheim. There it joins up with Schaubecker Straße, a long-distance route that was formerly of vital importance because it linked the North-West of Germany with the South and the South East. This made it part of the network of early and prehistoric highways in Germany.

 

​The castle keep and two adjacent parallel wings were secured by trenches on three sides. The exterior is solid in construction, and the foundations of the old tower are clearly visible on the ground plan, as are the strong walls facing north, west and south. The interior is dominated by timber framing (16th century). The living areas were constructed mainly by the aristocratic Plieningen family (1480-1642). It is possible that the Burg once had a shield wall on the side facing the mountain, as remains of a massive defensive wall have been found in trenches to the South and the East. It is also clear from the illustration in the Kieser forest map that there was a drawbridge.

 

Around 1620 – there no longer being any point in maintaining its character as a stronghold in the light of advances in firearms – the Burg was converted into a Schloss (“mansion”, “chateau”). The stairwell in the courtyard became a focal point, and all the other alterations were adapted to match it. The wine cellar was established under the north wing, and the windows were installed in the style of architect and designer Heinrich Schickhardt. Between 1749 and 1765, in keeping with the prevalent artistic trend of the day, the north and west façades were painted in red and violet, with the right-angle quoins set in a diamond configuration. The decoration of the castle clearly reflects the architecture of the Renaissance era, and to some degree also the Baroque.

THE FOUNDATIONS OF BURG SCHAUBECK

​Situated on a twisting, undercut bank on the River Bottwar, Burg Schaubeck dates back to at least 1272. Shielded from storms on the side facing the river, with the other side facing the mountain and set apart by a frontal ditch and a circular trench, the Burg (“Castle”) was originally very well-fortified, though few traces remain of this function today. During the High Middle Ages, Burg Schaubeck dominated the ancient highway known today as Alte Kleinbottwarer Straße, which runs along the wall of the garden and on towards Steinheim. There it joins up with Schaubecker Straße, a long-distance route that was formerly of vital importance because it linked the North-West of Germany with the South and the South East. This made it part of the network of early and prehistoric highways in Germany.

 

​The castle keep and two adjacent parallel wings were secured by trenches on three sides. The exterior is solid in construction, and the foundations of the old tower are clearly visible on the ground plan, as are the strong walls facing north, west and south. The interior is dominated by timber framing (16th century). The living areas were constructed mainly by the aristocratic Plieningen family (1480-1642). It is possible that the Burg once had a shield wall on the side facing the mountain, as remains of a massive defensive wall have been found in trenches to the South and the East. It is also clear from the illustration in the Kieser forest map that there was a drawbridge.

 

Around 1620 – there no longer being any point in maintaining its character as a stronghold in the light of advances in firearms – the Burg was converted into a Schloss (“mansion”, “chateau”). The stairwell in the courtyard became a focal point, and all the other alterations were adapted to match it. The wine cellar was established under the north wing, and the windows were installed in the style of architect and designer Heinrich Schickhardt. Between 1749 and 1765, in keeping with the prevalent artistic trend of the day, the north and west façades were painted in red and violet, with the right-angle quoins set in a diamond configuration. The decoration of the castle clearly reflects the architecture of the Renaissance era, and to some degree also the Baroque.

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